Regents Chemistry Test Preparation Practice

    Regents Test, Full Exam Practice Online: chemistry January 2013

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    Base your answers to questions 52 through 54 on the information below.

    The potential energy diagram and balanced equation shown below represent a reaction between solid carbon and hydrogen gas to produce 1 mole of C2H4(g) at 101.3 kPa and 298 K.

    heat-of-reaction-amd-potential-energy-diagram fig: chem12013-exam_g15.png

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    Base your answers to questions 55 through 58 on the information below.

    The atomic number and corresponding atomic radius of the Period 3 elements are shown in the data table below.

    significent-figures-conversions fig: chem12013-exam_g16.png

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    Base your answers to questions 59 through 61 on the information below.

    The equation below represents the reaction between 1-butene and bromine to form the compound 1,2-dibromobutane, C4H8Br2.

    hydrocarbons fig: chem12013-exam_g17.png

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    Base your answers to questions 62 through 65 on the information below.

    Ammonium chloride is dissolved in water to form a 0.10 M NH4Cl(aq) solution. This dissolving process is represented by the equation below.

    concentration-of-a-solution fig: chem12013-exam_g18.png

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    Base your answers to questions 66 through 69 on the information below.

    Nitrogen gas and oxygen gas make up about 99% of Earth’s atmosphere. Other atmospheric gases include argon, carbon dioxide, methane, ozone, hydrogen, etc.

    The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere can vary. Data for the concentration of CO2(g) from 1960 to 2000 are shown in the table below.

    identification-of-element fig: chem12013-exam_g19.png

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    Base your answers to questions 70 through 72 on the information below.

    Metallic elements are obtained from their ores by reduction. Some metals, such as zinc, lead, iron, and copper, can be obtained by heating their oxides with carbon.

    More active metals, such as aluminum, magnesium, and sodium, can not be reduced by carbon. These metals can be obtained by the electrolysis of their molten (melted) ores. The diagram below represents an incomplete cell for the electrolysis of molten NaCl. The equation below represents the reaction that occurs when the completed cell operates.

    electrolytic-cell fig: chem12013-exam_g20.png

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    Base your answers to questions 73 through 76 on the information below.

    The element boron, a trace element in Earth’s crust, is found in foods produced from plants. Boron has only two naturally occurring stable isotopes, boron-10 and boron-11.

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    Base your answers to questions 77 through 79 on the information below.

    The active ingredient in the pain reliever aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid. This compound can be produced by reacting salicylic acid with acetic acid. The label of one aspirin bottle indicates that the accepted mass of acetylsalicylic acid in each tablet is 325 milligrams.

    In a laboratory, an aspirin tablet is crushed and mixed with water to dissolve all of the acetylsalicylic acid. The measured pH of the resulting solution is 3.0.

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    Base your answers to questions 80 through 82 on the information below.

    A student investigated heat transfer using a bottle of water. The student placed the bottle in a room at 20.5°C. The student measured the temperature of the water in the bottle at 7 a.m. and again at 3 p.m. The data from the investigation are shown in the table below.

    heat-and-temperature fig: chem12013-exam_g21.png

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    Base your answers to questions 83 through 85 on the information below.

    In one method of making bread, starch is broken down into glucose. Zymase, an enzyme present in yeast, acts as a catalyst for the reaction in which the glucose reacts to produce ethanol and carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide gas causes the bread dough to rise. The balanced equation below represents the catalyzed reaction.

    types-of-organic-reactions fig: chem12013-exam_g22.png

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